Sunday, March 18, 2018

Review (+ Tour GIVEAWAY): The Innkeeper's Daughter by Michelle Griep




About the Book

Title: The Innkeeper’s Daughter  
Author: Michelle Griep  
Genre: Historical Christian Fiction  
Release Date: March 1, 2018
   
A London officer goes undercover to expose a plot against the Crown Dover, England, 1808: Officer Alexander Moore goes undercover as a gambling gentleman to expose a high-stakes plot against the king—and he’s a master of disguise, for Johanna Langley believes him to be quite the rogue. . .until she can no longer fight against his unrelenting charm. 

All Johanna wants is to keep the family inn afloat, but when the rent and the hearth payment are due at the same time, where will she find the extra funds? If she doesn’t come up with the money, there will be nowhere to go other than the workhouse—where she’ll be separated from her ailing mother and ten-year-old brother. 

Alex desperately wants to help Johanna, especially when she confides in him, but his mission—finding and bringing to justice a traitor to the crown—must come first, or they could all end up dead.

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My Thoughts

Dover, England - 1808

Romance, history, intrigue and espionage … a book by Michelle Griep is simply not to be missed, and reading The Innkeeper’s Daughter is sheer delight. The story moves at a steady pace that kept me eager to turn the pages. Griep does British settings, my favorite sub-genre, so very well. Along with romantic suspense, I always learn something new from the historical detail and delightful humor adds to the charm. Without going into detail, there’s a historic gem that gave me new insight into a line from The Star Spangled Banner.

I’m not an expert on styles, but The Innkeeper’s Daughter seems to combine elements of Regency and Dickens – all I know is that I loved it. From the lead characters, Alex and Johanna, to a wonderful supporting cast, all are well-drawn. Fans of Griep’s earlier novels will be delighted to see Brentwood’s appearance. And I think she created one of the most unusual secondary characters I’ve ever come across – Mr. Nutbrown, who speaks through a puppet.

Going undercover in seeking the identity of a suspected traitor among Dover’s elite puts Alex in Johanna’s world, and I was totally at a loss in knowing who to trust. Alex was famous for going beyond the rules to capture a criminal, and when it came to the prim, yet saucy Johanna, Alex thought that “Bow Street could use an interrogator like this woman.”

Griep’s writing is very descriptive, giving me a clear feel for the era and it’s people. There’s a beautiful example that I want to share, taken from a scene when Alex visits Lord Cobum’s mansion:

He knew no one, but could name them just the same. The fat merchant hoping to sell his soul to gain a contract with the viscount was Greed. The servant sneaking off for a tryst in an unused closet, Lust. And the pair of matrons whose plan was to allow their charges enough slack to hog-tie a bachelor? Self-serving Languor. Here in a manor home or down at a quayside bawdy house, people were people the world ‘round.

There’s nothing to indicate that The Innkeeper’s Daughter isn’t a standalone novel, but I certainly hope more is on the horizon. Romance seems likely for Johanna’s mom and Alex’s boss. There’s a moving scene involving an injured Mr. Nutbrown at the end and I’d love to know more about him. And then there’s Alex’s fellow worker, Thatcher – a man of few words, an “officer of shadow and dust” with a unique ability at camouflage. More, please!

Highly recommended.

I received a copy of this book through Celebrate Lit. The opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own.


About the Author

Michelle Griep has been writing since she first discovered blank wall space and Crayolas. She seeks to glorify God in all that she writes—except for that graffiti phase she went through as a teenager. She resides in the frozen tundra of Minnesota, where she teaches history and writing classes for a local high school co-op. 

An Anglophile at heart, she runs away to England every chance she gets, under the guise of research. Really, though, she’s eating excessive amounts of scones while rambling around a castle. 

Michelle is a member of ACFW (American Christian Fiction Writers) and MCWG (Minnesota Christian Writers Guild). Keep up with her adventures at her blog “Writer off the Leash” or visit www.michellegriep.com.


Guest Post from Michelle Griep

Celebrating Oak Apple Day

Spring is just around the corner, or maybe it’s in full bloom in your neck of the woods. Regardless, by this time of year, everyone is ready to celebrate. . .and nothing new is under the sun. For centuries people have been eager to welcome budding greenery and warmth. 

In my recent release, The Innkeeper’s Daughter, I incorporated a spring holiday that’s been around for over 500 years in England, one you may never heard of. 

Oak Apple Day. 

This ancient celebration dates back to the year 1651. At the time, Charles II escaped the Roundhead army by taking cover in an oak tree. Everyone loved ol’ Charlie and was glad he lived, so in his honor, a new national holiday was born—one that in some parts of England is still celebrated today. 

Another name for this annual event is Royal Oak Day and the festivities occur every May 29th. Celebration traditions vary from parades to the ringing of bells, but one thing that is standard is that it’s a day to pin an oak leaf on your lapel. If you fail to wear one, you could end up getting pinched. 

The hero in my latest release is kind enough to remind the heroine that she forgot to pin on her leaf, thus saving her from untoward pinches. Interested in hearing more about this gallant fellow and the forgetful miss? Here’s a blurb about The Innkeeper’s Daughter… 

Tension is high with the threat of a Napoleonic attack in Regency England, but risk from abroad means nothing when there’s danger at home. 

Officer Alexander Moore goes undercover as a gambling gentleman to expose a high-stakes plot against the crown—and he’s a master of disguise, for Johanna Langley believes him to be quite the rogue . . . until she can no longer fight against his unrelenting charm. 

All Johanna wants is to keep the family inn afloat, but when the rent and the hearth payment are due at the same time, where will she find the extra funds? If she doesn’t come up with the money, there will be nowhere to go other than the workhouse—where she’ll be separated from her ailing mother and ten-year-old brother. 

Alex desperately wants to help Johanna, especially when she confides in him, but his mission—finding and bringing to justice a traitor to the crown—must come first, or they could all end up dead. 

It’s a race against time for them both.


Blog Stops

Mommynificent, March 16
Among the Reads, March 17
Mary Hake, March 17
Karen Sue Hadley, March 18
Kathleen Denly, March 19
Remembrancy, March 20
Book by Book, March 20
Bookworm Mama, March 22
Vicky Sluiter, March 22
Carpe Diem, March 22
Pause for Tales, March 23
margaret kazmierczak, March 23 (Interview)
A Greater Yes, March 24
Simple Harvest Reads, March 26 (Mindy Houng Guest Post)
Pursuing Stacie, March 27
Bigreadersite, March 27
The PhD Mamma, March 28


Giveaway



If you’re willing, please help spread the word by clicking on this link and sharing my Facebook post. Thank you!

To celebrate her tour, Michelle is giving away a grand prize of a signed copy of The Innkeeper’s Daughter and a $25 gift card from Barnes & Noble!!

Click the image above or the link below to enter. Be sure to comment on this post before you enter to claim 9 extra entries!


20 comments:

  1. Thank you for your review and information on "The Innkeeper’s Daughter" by Michelle Griep as well as being part of the book tour. I've very much love the opportunity to read this book.
    2clowns at arkansas dot net

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    1. Maybe you'll be the lucky duck winner!

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    2. I'm pretty sure you will enjoy this story, Kay. If you haven't read any of Michelle's books before, this is a good one to start with. Good to see you again.

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  2. I had not heard of Oak Apple Day, similar in a way to St. Patrick's Day where you may get pinched if not wearing the appropriate symbol--the oak leaf for Oak Apple Day and/or green for St. Patrick's Day. How interesting! I'm eager to read The Innkeeper's Daughter!

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    1. I hadn't heard of it either but it sure did intrigue me!

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    2. English villages often had unique celebrations or festivals and it's so much fun learning about them. Thanks for visiting, Susie.

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  3. I really enjoyed the description of the book. Looking forward to reading. Adding to my TBR list.

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    1. I love being on your TBR pile!

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    2. I'm sure you will enjoy this story, Dianne. Best wishes in the drawing!

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  4. Thanks for hosting me, Carole! I super love the piano picture at the top of this page!

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    1. Thank you for taking the time to visit, Michelle. That piano picture really resonated with me when I saw it. I've been a church pianist for over 50 years, and it reminds me of all the beloved hymns which are rarely sung today, especially with the title "Forgotten Tunes."

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  5. I'm so happy that Brentwood makes a reappearance in this book, and I'm looking forward to reading this! I had never heard of Oak Apple Day until reading about this book. Now I've wondered if my ancestors celebrated it.

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    1. I haven't read Brentwood's story yet, Becky, but it's on my Kindle. Now I'm eager to read it soon. Thanks for visiting my blog, Becky.

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  6. I read Brentwood's Ward and really liked it. I've read several other of Michelle's books and find her to be quite a versatile author. Though I haven't read all of her books, I hope to!

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  7. I enjoyed your review. Can't wait to read this one!

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  8. This book looks so exciting!! I am just dying to read it. :-) Shared the post.

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  9. Interesting post. I'd never heard of Oak Apple Day/Royal Oak Day before.

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